Roger Mickelson’s History Today (5/30/13)
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Roger asks the questions below.  Only he can answer the why and what with any certainty, but we’ll continue to post them as he sends them.  Folks who access this blog seem to enjoy this feature when it is posted.

Why am I still doing this?        It’s been many years of commentary.        To what purpose?
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Hundred Years’ War:    In 1431, having led the French army in a momentous victory over England at Orléans, Joan of Arc was charged with heresy and witchcraft and was burned at the stake. Her place among the saints is secured, not perhaps by the somewhat dubious miracles attributed to her, but by the heroic fortitude with which she endured the ordeal of her trial and, except for one lapse toward its end, by her profound conviction of the justice of her cause, sustained by faith in the divine origin of her voices. In many ways a victim of internal strife within France, condemned by judges and assessors who were almost entirely northern French in origin, she has become a symbol of national consciousness with whom all French people, of whatever creed or party, can identify.
Joan of Arc

Joan of Arc (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Napoleonic Wars:    In 1814, the first of the Treaties of Paris was signed, ending the long wars. Napoleon had abdicated as France’s emperor in April, and the victorious Allies, even after nearly a quarter century of war, gave generous terms to France under the restored Bourbon dynasty. France was allowed to retain its boundaries of January 1, 1792, keeping possession of the enclaves annexed in the early years of the French Revolution. France was restored the majority of its foreign colonies, but Tobago and Saint Lucia in the West Indies and the Île-de-France (now Mauritius) in the Indian Ocean were ceded to Great Britain. The treaty dealt only in general terms with the disposal of the European territories taken from the French empire and ended with the provision that all of the powers engaged on either side in the war should send plenipotentiaries to the Congress of Vienna to complete those arrangements.
In 1911, the first Indianapolis 500 automobile race was run in Indianapolis, Indiana.
In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. This stately monument honors Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, and “the virtues of tolerance, honesty, and constancy in the human spirit.” Designed by Henry Bacon on a plan similar to that of the Parthenon in Athens, the structure was constructed on reclaimed marshland along the banks of the Potomac River. The site selection caused controversy; the speaker of the House of Representatives, Joseph Cannon, favored a more prominent spot across the Potomac, maintaining: “I’ll never let a memorial to Abraham Lincoln be erected in that g– damned swamp.”
The Lincoln Memorial is a United States Presid...

The Lincoln Memorial is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1958, unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. The Tomb of the Unknowns, also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which was established in 1921 as the burial place for the Unknown Soldier of World War I. In 1932 a seven-piece Colorado-Yule marble sarcophagus, constructed at a cost of $48,000, was positioned above the Unknown Soldier’s grave. The Unknown Soldier from the Vietnam War was buried there with full military honors on Memorial Day in 1984, but in 1998 further investigation, including DNA testing, led to his identification as US Air Force First Lieutenant Michael Joseph Blassie. His remains were returned to his family, and this crypt remains empty. Because of advances in medical and other identification techniques, no further interments in the tomb were anticipated.
Tomb of Unknown soldier

Tomb of Unknown soldier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1981, Zia ur-Rahman, President of Bangladesh, was assassinated in a failed military coup. He had been a Major General who led a successful coup in November 1975, holding power during the intervening years.

Regards, Roger Mickelson
Source material includes Associated Press International and Encyclopædia Britannica.
“The price of hating other human beings is loving oneself less.”        Eldridge Cleaver

Why am I still doing this?        It’s been many years of commentary.        To what purpose?
###########################################################################################
Hundred Years’ War:    In 1431, having led the French army in a momentous victory over England at Orléans, Joan of Arc was charged with heresy and witchcraft and was burned at the stake. Her place among the saints is secured, not perhaps by the somewhat dubious miracles attributed to her, but by the heroic fortitude with which she endured the ordeal of her trial and, except for one lapse toward its end, by her profound conviction of the justice of her cause, sustained by faith in the divine origin of her voices. In many ways a victim of internal strife within France, condemned by judges and assessors who were almost entirely northern French in origin, she has become a symbol of national consciousness with whom all French people, of whatever creed or party, can identify.
Napoleonic Wars:    In 1814, the first of the Treaties of Paris was signed, ending the long wars. Napoleon had abdicated as France’s emperor in April, and the victorious Allies, even after nearly a quarter century of war, gave generous terms to France under the restored Bourbon dynasty. France was allowed to retain its boundaries of January 1, 1792, keeping possession of the enclaves annexed in the early years of the French Revolution. France was restored the majority of its foreign colonies, but Tobago and Saint Lucia in the West Indies and the Île-de-France (now Mauritius) in the Indian Ocean were ceded to Great Britain. The treaty dealt only in general terms with the disposal of the European territories taken from the French empire and ended with the provision that all of the powers engaged on either side in the war should send plenipotentiaries to the Congress of Vienna to complete those arrangements.
In 1911, the first Indianapolis 500 automobile race was run in Indianapolis, Indiana.
In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. This stately monument honors Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, and “the virtues of tolerance, honesty, and constancy in the human spirit.” Designed by Henry Bacon on a plan similar to that of the Parthenon in Athens, the structure was constructed on reclaimed marshland along the banks of the Potomac River. The site selection caused controversy; the speaker of the House of Representatives, Joseph Cannon, favored a more prominent spot across the Potomac, maintaining: “I’ll never let a memorial to Abraham Lincoln be erected in that g– damned swamp.”
In 1958, unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. The Tomb of the Unknowns, also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which was established in 1921 as the burial place for the Unknown Soldier of World War I. In 1932 a seven-piece Colorado-Yule marble sarcophagus, constructed at a cost of $48,000, was positioned above the Unknown Soldier’s grave. The Unknown Soldier from the Vietnam War was buried there with full military honors on Memorial Day in 1984, but in 1998 further investigation, including DNA testing, led to his identification as US Air Force First Lieutenant Michael Joseph Blassie. His remains were returned to his family, and this crypt remains empty. Because of advances in medical and other identification techniques, no further interments in the tomb were anticipated.

In 1981, Zia ur-Rahman, President of Bangladesh, was assassinated in a failed military coup. He had been a Major General who led a successful coup in November 1975, holding power during the intervening years.

Regards, Roger Mickelson
Source material includes Associated Press International and Encyclopædia Britannica.
“The price of hating other human beings is loving oneself less.”        Eldridge Cleaver

Why am I still doing this?        It’s been many years of commentary.        To what purpose?
###########################################################################################
Hundred Years’ War:    In 1431, having led the French army in a momentous victory over England at Orléans, Joan of Arc was charged with heresy and witchcraft and was burned at the stake. Her place among the saints is secured, not perhaps by the somewhat dubious miracles attributed to her, but by the heroic fortitude with which she endured the ordeal of her trial and, except for one lapse toward its end, by her profound conviction of the justice of her cause, sustained by faith in the divine origin of her voices. In many ways a victim of internal strife within France, condemned by judges and assessors who were almost entirely northern French in origin, she has become a symbol of national consciousness with whom all French people, of whatever creed or party, can identify.
Napoleonic Wars:    In 1814, the first of the Treaties of Paris was signed, ending the long wars. Napoleon had abdicated as France’s emperor in April, and the victorious Allies, even after nearly a quarter century of war, gave generous terms to France under the restored Bourbon dynasty. France was allowed to retain its boundaries of January 1, 1792, keeping possession of the enclaves annexed in the early years of the French Revolution. France was restored the majority of its foreign colonies, but Tobago and Saint Lucia in the West Indies and the Île-de-France (now Mauritius) in the Indian Ocean were ceded to Great Britain. The treaty dealt only in general terms with the disposal of the European territories taken from the French empire and ended with the provision that all of the powers engaged on either side in the war should send plenipotentiaries to the Congress of Vienna to complete those arrangements.
In 1911, the first Indianapolis 500 automobile race was run in Indianapolis, Indiana.
In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. This stately monument honors Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, and “the virtues of tolerance, honesty, and constancy in the human spirit.” Designed by Henry Bacon on a plan similar to that of the Parthenon in Athens, the structure was constructed on reclaimed marshland along the banks of the Potomac River. The site selection caused controversy; the speaker of the House of Representatives, Joseph Cannon, favored a more prominent spot across the Potomac, maintaining: “I’ll never let a memorial to Abraham Lincoln be erected in that g– damned swamp.”
In 1958, unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. The Tomb of the Unknowns, also known as the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, which was established in 1921 as the burial place for the Unknown Soldier of World War I. In 1932 a seven-piece Colorado-Yule marble sarcophagus, constructed at a cost of $48,000, was positioned above the Unknown Soldier’s grave. The Unknown Soldier from the Vietnam War was buried there with full military honors on Memorial Day in 1984, but in 1998 further investigation, including DNA testing, led to his identification as US Air Force First Lieutenant Michael Joseph Blassie. His remains were returned to his family, and this crypt remains empty. Because of advances in medical and other identification techniques, no further interments in the tomb were anticipated.

In 1981, Zia ur-Rahman, President of Bangladesh, was assassinated in a failed military coup. He had been a Major General who led a successful coup in November 1975, holding power during the intervening years.

Regards, Roger Mickelson
Source material includes Associated Press International and Encyclopædia Britannica.
“The price of hating other human beings is loving oneself less.”        Eldridge Cleaver
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